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Diet and Physical Activity for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

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Diet and Physical Activity for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

Post by PastorDan on Thu Jun 09, 2016 8:27 am

From a recent (June, 2016) report in the American Family Physician journal, the following findings were reported.

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States. One-third of these deaths may be preventable through healthy lifestyle choices including diet and physical activity. The Mediterranean diet is associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality, whereas the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) eating plan is associated with a reduced risk of coronary artery disease. Substituting dietary saturated fat with polyunsaturated fatty acids is associated with improved cardiovascular outcomes, although exogenous supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids does not improve cardiovascular outcomes. There is an association between increased sodium intake and cardiovascular risk, but reducing dietary sodium has not consistently shown a reduction in cardiovascular risk. Physical activity recommendations for adults are at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity per week, 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity per week, or an equivalent combination. Increases in physical activity by any level are associated with reduced cardiovascular risk. Introducing muscle-strengthening activities at least twice per week in previously inactive adults is associated with improved cardiovascular outcomes. Inactive adults without known CVD can gradually increase activity to a moderate-intensity level without consulting a physician. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends behavioral counseling to promote healthy diet and physical activity in adults at high risk of CVD. Evidence of benefit for counseling patients at average risk is less established.

Click here to read an online version of the full article.

Also, click here to read a simplified Q&A.

The bottom line is that we can generally expect to reduce our risk of "Heart Disease" if we exercise for about 2.5 hours per week and/or adjust our diets by following a few simple healthy guidelines.

The article says that you can safely slowly increase your physical activity over time if you have no history of CVD. Of course it never hurts to check with your family doctor first.




The Bible talks a lot about stewardship - the concept that whatever God has given to us, we are to be faithful managers of it. Our physical bodies and our "aliveness" - our lives - are gifts from God.

Let's be good stewards.

If you are looking for some support from fellow Christians as you try to change your diet and/or exercise plan, post below.

And don't forget HCLC's own Fitness ministry.
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PastorDan
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